at the UW

The Environmental Humanities

Other options

Upcoming Classes

  • English 335: Living in Place
    Department or time schedule link
    Our focus for this course will be upon how literature deals with the environment, i.e., how literary texts represent environmental issues and why it matters that they be represented in this form. How, that is, does where we live and, even more importantly, how we imagine the place in which we live, affect who we are? How do our relationships to nature and our relationships with other people intersect? We will be considering a range of prose texts, including both fictional narratives and a variety of non-fictional essays and journalism. Course goals include: 1) developing the analytical reading skills appropriate to different kinds of literary texts, 2) working on how to formulate and sustain critical arguments in writing, 3) learning how to uncover the logic and stakes of specific attitudes toward the natural world, 4) understanding how environmental issues are linked to other social and cultural concerns, 5) seeing how those linkages are affected by particular historical and political conditions. The course will contain a significant writing component, both regular informal writing assignments and several medium-length analytical papers; it can count for W-credit.
    Instructor: Gary Handwerk

Course Catalogue

  • ENGL 335: Living in Place
    Instructor: Gary Handwerk

    ANTH 210: Introduction to Environmental Anthropology
    Instructor: Stevan Harrell

    SISEA/ANTH 406: Environment & Society in China
    Instructor: Stevan Harrell

    HSTAA/ENVIR 221: Environmental History of the US
    Instructor: Linda Nash

    HST 498: Senior Colloquium - Environmental History of the Pacific Northwest
    Instructor: Linda Nash

    EURO 301/GERMAN 390: European Politics & Society
    Instructor: Sabine Wilke

Gary Handwerk: Gary Handwerk works on modern European narrative and narrative theory, with particular interest in narrative ethics and the relation between political philosophy and fiction. His recent publications have focused on Romantic-era texts and include critical editions of William Godwin's Caleb Williams and Fleetwood (Broadview Press) and essays on several of Godwin's novels and on Rousseau's Emile. He is the translator and editor of Nietzsche's Human, All Too Human (Stanford University Press), and author of an article on Romantic irony in the Cambridge History of Literary Criticism. His latest interest is in literature and the environment; he teaches a UW course on this topic that is linked to local high school classes. CV (pdf) | Website | Email

Richard Watts: Bio goes here
CV (pdf) | Website | Email

Linda Nash: Bio goes here
CV (pdf) | Website | Email

Sabine Wilke: Bio goes here
CV (pdf) | Website | Email

Spring 2013 Environmental Humanities Conference

Office Hours: This is a time where you and I can meet outside class to discuss assignments, questions about the reading, concerns about expectations, etc. If my scheduled hours are inaccessible to you, please email me to make appointments for another time.

Environmental Humanities Reading Group

Writing Centers: We all benefit from having outside readers, or editors, giving feedback on drafts of our work. The Odegaard Writing & Research Center is a free interdisciplinary writing center that provides writing and research assistance from trained writing tutors and librarians during all stages of the writing process. Open Sunday-Thursday from 1:30-4:30 p.m. and 6:00-9:00 p.m.. Appointments and walk-ins welcome. Please visit http://www.depts.washington.edu/owrc for more information.

A few box examples

This shows how various classes can be combined with #msg and the #dates DIVs to create various effects.

They can be moved with "floatL" and "floatR" and shadowed with "shadowL" and "shadowR" and their width altered with "slim" and "wide."

A #dates box

belongs to classes:

  • floatL
  • shadowR
  • slim

A #dates box

belongs to classes:

  • floatL
  • shadowL

A #dates box

belongs to classes:

  • floatL
  • shadowR
  • wide

The boxes below use an "option" class that lays a graphic background over the thick border at the top of the box.

This is done using CSS pseudo elements. Only 2 are allowed per element, so the "option" effect displaces the "shadowL" effect--which uses the same trick.

The graphics are all in one file, "option_bg.jpg," and are currently sized for 200px wide. Hence they don't stretch the full width of the "wide" class, illustrated above. That's easily fixed, but I'm not sure the idea is one you'll want to pursue or not.

A #msg box

belongs to classes:

  • floatL
  • option0
  • shadowR

A #msg box

belongs to classes:

  • floatL
  • option1
  • shadowR
  • slim

A #msg box

belongs to classes:

  • floatL
  • option2
  • shadowR

A #msg box

belongs to classes:

  • floatL
  • option3
  • shadowR

A #msg box

belongs to classes:

  • floatL
  • option4
  • shadowR
  • slim

A #msg box

belongs to classes:

  • floatL
  • option5
  • shadowR

A #msg box

belongs to classes:

  • floatL
  • option6
  • shadowR

A #msg box

belongs to classes:

  • floatL
  • option7
  • shadowR
  • slim

A #msg box

belongs to classes:

  • floatL
  • option8
  • shadowR

SLIDES.JS

Weird thing here is that absolutely-positioned headings are temporarily covered during fade-in.

Sub-topic

Secondary blurb